THE PLACE TO GO WHEN YOU CAN'T GO BACKPACKING

Screen Shot 2016-09-01 at 4.36.08 PM

Elite DriDown Hoody

in Community/Gear by

Finally, a down jacket that is dressed to impress on the trail; not just the city sidewalk.

Avid outdoors enthusiasts flock to down coats because of their exceptional compressibility and impressive warmth-to-weight ratio. However, the age-old issue with down has been that it’s useless when wet. Sierra Designs offers a DriDown alternative that excels in the Northwest’s rainy and humid weather. Fit for summer and winter trips alike, you’re probably not enjoying your hiking or backpacking trip to the fullest until you’ve tried their Elite DriDown hoody.

Sizing.

Like most jackets, I recommend getting a size up. If you’re using the Elite DriDown hoody in the outdoors, more room to move will help you enjoy your trip. Although I’m 5’6’’ and typically wear small shirts, I tested a Medium. It fit perfectly to accommodate athletic use with light layering. I recommend following Sierra Design’s sizing chart, it won’t steer you adrift! Arm length is generous (34.5 inches, but who’s counting) to accommodate reaching forward or up above your head with thumbs in the thumb holes. Unlike a few competitor jackets I’ve tested in the past, the Elite DriDown Hoody won’t shortchange you in length.

Elite DriDown hoody
The Elite hoody in its natural environment.

Function.

The Elite DriDown Hoody is fitted for function rather than fashion. With a back length of just over 26 inches, I could pull the coat comfortably down to my upper thighs to keep out the chill. Unlike the fashion-focused jackets, the Elite DriDown Hoody features a subtle elastic waist that prevents it from riding up when seated. Sorry, fashionistas — functionality over fashion is always a win in my book.

Features.

In typical Sierra Designs style, the manufacturer slips in a few clever features. The generously sized thumb holes are lined with stretch nylon flaps that seal the hole when not in use. This means no chilly breezes down your sleeve when you’re not using the thumb holes. The fitted hood is lined with a knit nylon fabric for a comfortable, moisture-reducing contact against your forehead and chin when fully zipped. The hood is fully convertible, and can easily be tucked down inside itself to form a draft-resistant collar. This adaptable feature makes your Elite DriDown hoody ready for even the most intense adventures.

Elite DriDown hoody
Draft-free thumb holes and fitted sleeves for increased insulation.

Materials.

One of the biggest benefits of the Sierra Designs Elite hoody is that it features 850 fill power duck DriDown. If you aren’t familiar with DriDown, here’s the rundown: it’s a backpacking game changer. DriDown is conventional down that is treated with a molecular-level polymer to give each individual down plume a hydrophobic finish. This allows DriDown to stay dry 10 times longer than regular down and dry faster than your conventional down jacket. If you hike and backpack in a wet area like the Pacific Northwest, this can make the difference between a fun or miserable trip (and it could even save your life). To seal the deal, the nylon ripstop is treated with a polyurethane finish for additional water resistance.

The Test.

I put the Sierra Designs Elite DriDown hoody through an extensive series of tests that all started with the same letter, but wildly ranged in activity and utility: biking, boating, and backpacking. From the Palouse to the North Cascades, from land to lake, the Elite hoody didn’t get an out when it came to testing.

Biking: The Sierra Designs Elite hoody followed me on a week-long road biking trip up the rural roads of Eastern Washington. Even in the desert and Palouse, warm days result in cold, humid nights and mornings. The Elite hoody stayed dry and warm throughout the trip, and remained my go-to source of warmth when even my fleece was saturated. Those who are interested in bike camping can rely on the Elite hoody’s packability.

Backpacking: When it comes to the mountains, Elite hoody is unarguably in its element. The Elite DriDown hoody weighs in at around 11 oz and packs down to about the size of a 20-oz water bottle. With its 850DriDown fill, this small jacket packs a punch when it comes to warmth. Ultralight and ultra compact, the Elite hoody is an essential for any Northwest backpacking trip.

Elite DriDown hoody
The Elite Hoody’s relaxed fit makes it easy to move, no matter what you’re doing.

Boating? No, not the sophisticated kind. I took the Elite DriDown hoody along on a 22-mile overnight canoe trip that mostly consisted of fighting downwind currents or paddling against gusts of winds as the rain closes. Not picturesque at all. Let’s just say that the Elite DriDown hoody was about the best decision I made on that trip. With its hydrophobic down and water resistant nylon shell, I felt comfortable using the hoody without a rain jacket. The DriDown allowed a semi-saturated jacket to fully dry out within two hours. Because I could rely on it to dry quickly, I find the Elite hoody to be a reliable comfort (or survival) tool in my pack. In the Northwest, it’s arguably one of the ten essentials.

Elite DriDown hoody
I may be incapable of making fire the old fashioned way, but the Elite DriDown Hoody will keep me warm nonetheless!

Final thoughts.

Before reading my final recommendations, please keep in mind that I run cold. Because the hoody is designed to be light and compact, the Elite hoody can suffice as a main layer for late spring-early fall, depending on elevation. I estimate it to keep me warm down to about 50 degrees. While I designate it mostly as a summer backpacking coat, I do think that the Elite DriDown hoody is a great jacket for year-round layering. Pacific Northwesterners can rejoice in its hydrophobic nature and resilience to nature. If you’re looking for a light, compact and completely functional down jacket, I recommend adding the Elite DriDown hoody to your arsenal.

Elite DriDown™ Hoody

$249.00
Elite DriDown™ Hoody
9

Water Resistent

10/10

    Ultralight

    9/10

      Fit

      9/10

        Features

        9/10

          Pros

          • Compact
          • Lightweight
          • Versatile
          • Fit for Function

          Cons

          • Pricey
          • Summer-Fall Backpacking

          Melissa was born and raised in the Northwest and grew up hiking in the Cascades and exploring the wild beaches of the San Juan Islands. Her first backpacking trip was a 10 day trek across the Olympic Mountains, following the Quinault River. During college she spent four months abroad in New Zealand studying writing and backpacking throughout the North and South islands. An avid hiker and outdoorswoman, Melissa is inspired by her outdoor adventures, whether they are bouldering, backpacking, hiking, trail running, scrambling, or simply setting up her hammock in the sun. After graduating from the University of Puget Sound in May 2010 Melissa has begun a career as a freelance writer and juggles painting, poetry, and writing a novel in her spare time.

          Loading Facebook Comments ...

          Leave a Reply

          Latest from Community

          glamping-hub-washington-3

          Glamping Hub

          By: Jessica Armstrong Glamping Hub Saying hello to winter and goodbye to
          Go to Top