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Hanwag Tatra Lady GTX Boots Review

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Tatra Lady GTX

The German-made Tatra Lady GTX hiking boots from Hanwag are boots made ready to get outside. From their comfortable fit to their heavy duty traction to their serious waterproofness, these boots have the features to really help you get somewhere. So far, they’ve taken me up to alpine lakes, through snow fields and down muddy forest trails, and they’re just getting started.

Tatra Lady GTX
The Tatra Lady GTXs kept my feet warm and dry while snow caving at Mount Rainier

Before I tested the Tatra Lady GTXs, the only boots I had consistently used were my trusty, seven-year-old pair of Vasques. I had tried out a few other alternatives, but I always came back to the boots I had started hiking in. I’m not giving up those boots, but the Tatra Lady GTXs will now be seeing a lot of trail-time, too.

Hanwag describes the Tatra Lady GTXs as a “lightweight and high-quality trekking boot,” meant for general backpacking travel. These boots do definitely feel lightweight. For a boot with this high of an ankle, I was expecting a much heavier feel, but the Tatra Lady GTXs didn’t weigh me down even with big mileage or steep trails. The ankle support these boots afford is also a big plus. As someone who has experienced multiple ankle injuries, I could feel the Tatra Lady GTXs protecting me from potential rolls as I hiked.

The boots’ Vibram soles provide plenty of traction on a variety of terrains. Even on partially iced-over snow, the Tatra Lady GTXs maintained enough of a grip to get me safely across the section.

Where I was really impressed with the Tatra Lady GTXs was in their waterproofness. Made with a GORE-TEX liner, the boots advertise waterproofness, but I’ve seen plenty of hiking boots under-perform despite this claim. Crossing a stream in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness, the boots kept my feet dry even when submerged up to the ankle. On a hike in a torrential downpour, the boots easily beaded away the moisture. But the real test came during a two day snow trip up at Mount Rainier where I had the Tatra Lady GTXs on in the wet, spring snow at all times save for sleeping. All of the other members of my team were wearing plastic mountaineering boots, and, when I began the trip, I wondered if I had make a mistake I would sorely regret bringing only the Tatra Lady GTXs. Two days, near constant exposure to wet snow and my feet stayed 100% dry.

Tatra Lady GTX

The drawback that comes with such great waterproofness is, of course, a lack of breathability, so it makes sense that it would be my biggest complaint when it comes to the Tatra Lady GTXs. In mild climates, the boots perform wonderfully, but in hotter temperatures my feet started to get uncomfortable. When I went to Canyonlands National Park this past March, I purposefully left the Tatra Lady GTXs at home and opted for a thinner, more breathable pair of boots. The Tatra Lady GTXs are best suited for hiking in milder climates or in situations where the increased stability and waterproofness make the lack of breathability a worthy tradeoff.

Bottom Line:

I’ve finally found a pair of hiking boots that can compete with, if not replace, my old-faithfuls. A great boot for ankle support, trustworthy traction and stellar waterproofness.

Tech Specs:

Date Available: Available now

MSRP: $290.00

Sizes: 3, 5-9 (European)

Weight: 760 grams

Lining: GORE-TEX

Sole: Vibram AW Integral

Hanwag Tatra Lady GTX Boots

$290.00
Hanwag Tatra Lady GTX Boots
9.2

Weight

9/10

    Durability

    9/10

      Stability

      10/10

        Waterproofness

        10/10

          Ventilation

          8/10

            Pros

            • Great stabilizing power for ankle support
            • Held their waterproofness even after long-term exposure
            • Lightweight
            • Good traction

            Cons

            • A bit too warm for hot climate hikes

            Anna Elliott grew up canoeing in the Northwoods of Wisconsin where she acquired a love for all things wild. A month long backpack through the Wind River Range in Wyoming later convinced her that western mountains were the place to be. Moving to the Seattle area in 2011, Anna has been taking advantage of the wilderness playground that is the Pacific Northwest— hiking, climbing, trail running and paddling— ever since. Writing, editing and leading trips, she is always looking for opportunities to inspire others to get outside.

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